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Why Is Starting With Why So Hard?

WHAT DID I GET DONE THESE PAST 8 HOURS?

I finished the workflow-based project planning template, and used it on my first mini-project: finishing a proposal for a collaborative writing circle.

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE TO MY NORMAL WORK OUTPUT?

About the same, but I’m noticing that my afternoon output has definitely gone up thanks to Focusmate sessions in the afternoon and being focused on only one thing throughout the day. Having said that, the midday break to do some typing practice as well as quickly write and send out the proposed list of topics for the leadership training provided a good break in the middle of the morning.

DID I GET BOGGED DOWN? WHERE?

When I realised how hard it was to “start with why” (see below), I thought I should answer that question for all the projects I’m doing, and should do so this afternoon. But then after lunch I realised that I should carry on with my sole highlight and not deviate from it. And now I’m happy that I did.

WHAT WENT WELL? HOW CAN I REPLICATE THIS IN THE FUTURE?

For two days now, having a single highlight throughout the day has seemed to work well. That coupled with sufficient sleep (9 pm - 5 am). It seems at this stage to have worked well.

ANY OTHER TAKEAWAYS? LESSONS TO SHARE WITH OTHERS?

It’s really good to follow these Project Management steps, especially the first one for initiating the project. I did it three times over for the WorldScope project, and each time was important so that I could get closer and closer to the kernel of why I’m doing what I’m doing, the present limitations and the realities within which I am working. Just from answering a few simple questions such as Who am I doing this for? What am I doing? Why am I doing this? What would be missing from the world if this project didn’t exist? And I think that I want to go back and re-initiate all the projects that I am working on, just so I can be clear on the why of each of them, which helps quite tremendously with the motivation of it all.Another experiment that has seemed to work today has been the down-hill running approach. That means chunking each task into micro-tasks that can be carried out asynchronously. That means that once I get tired of Subtask 1.1 I can switch to 1.2, then back to 1.1 and then 1.2 until I’m done with both. This helps to alleviate exhaustion. Also the shorter Focusmate sessions in the afternoons seem to work well.

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